Blog Archive

Compared to a street map on which we look down on, the maps below show East and West “reversed”. This is because the sky map shows what we see looking up to the sky. Imagine you are lying on the ground on a starry night and you are looking vertically up to the sky. Your feet are pointing to the south. West is at your right then and east at your left hand side, exactly like it is displayed on the sky map.

Start time of pass: 22.59

Learn how to take images of the International Space Station here and don’t forget to upload them to the website! You will need to become a member, but don’t worry it’s FREE!

NOTE: The image shown is from Heavens Above, we take no credit for this image.

Compared to a street map on which we look down on, the maps below show East and West “reversed”. This is because the sky map shows what we see looking up to the sky. Imagine you are lying on the ground on a starry night and you are looking vertically up to the sky. Your feet are pointing to the south. West is at your right then and east at your left hand side, exactly like it is displayed on the sky map.

Start time of pass: 23.49

Learn how to take images of the International Space Station here and don’t forget to upload them to the website! You will need to become a member, but don’t worry it’s FREE!

NOTE: The image shown is from Heavens Above, we take no credit for this image.

Compared to a street map on which we look down on, the maps below show East and West “reversed”. This is because the sky map shows what we see looking up to the sky. Imagine you are lying on the ground on a starry night and you are looking vertically up to the sky. Your feet are pointing to the south. West is at your right then and east at your left hand side, exactly like it is displayed on the sky map.

Start time of pass: 22.13

Learn how to take images of the International Space Station here and don’t forget to upload them to the website! You will need to become a member, but don’t worry it’s FREE!

NOTE: The image shown is from Heavens Above, we take no credit for this image.

Compared to a street map on which we look down on, the maps below show East and West “reversed”. This is because the sky map shows what we see looking up to the sky. Imagine you are lying on the ground on a starry night and you are looking vertically up to the sky. Your feet are pointing to the south. West is at your right then and east at your left hand side, exactly like it is displayed on the sky map.

Start time of pass: 23.04

Learn how to take images of the International Space Station here and don’t forget to upload them to the website! You will need to become a member, but don’t worry it’s FREE!

NOTE: The image shown is from Heavens Above, we take no credit for this image.

Compared to a street map on which we look down on, the maps below show East and West “reversed”. This is because the sky map shows what we see looking up to the sky. Imagine you are lying on the ground on a starry night and you are looking vertically up to the sky. Your feet are pointing to the south. West is at your right then and east at your left hand side, exactly like it is displayed on the sky map.

Start time of pass: 23.55

Learn how to take images of the International Space Station here and don’t forget to upload them to the website! You will need to become a member, but don’t worry it’s FREE!

NOTE: The image shown is from Heavens Above, we take no credit for this image.

Compared to a street map on which we look down on, the maps below show East and West “reversed”. This is because the sky map shows what we see looking up to the sky. Imagine you are lying on the ground on a starry night and you are looking vertically up to the sky. Your feet are pointing to the south. West is at your right then and east at your left hand side, exactly like it is displayed on the sky map.

Start time of pass: 22.18

Learn how to take images of the International Space Station here and don’t forget to upload them to the website! You will need to become a member, but don’t worry it’s FREE!

NOTE: The image shown is from Heavens Above, we take no credit for this image.

Compared to a street map on which we look down on, the maps below show East and West “reversed”. This is because the sky map shows what we see looking up to the sky. Imagine you are lying on the ground on a starry night and you are looking vertically up to the sky. Your feet are pointing to the south. West is at your right then and east at your left hand side, exactly like it is displayed on the sky map.

Start time of pass: 23.09

Learn how to take images of the International Space Station here and don’t forget to upload them to the website! You will need to become a member, but don’t worry it’s FREE!

NOTE: The image shown is from Heavens Above, we take no credit for this image.

If you have a telescope it is possible to view the Great Red Spot (GRS) as it transits across Jupiter. The spot isn’t always visible, it moves around the planet and can only be seen as it crosses the Earth facing side of Jupiter.

The spot can be seen for around two hours before and two hours after it crosses the central point on the planet (the central meridian). This gives a 4 hour window for viewing the spot, the from and to times that the spot is visible can be seen at the top of this page. IMPORTANT NOTE – you will need to check when the plant is visible within the 4 hour window to avoid disappointment. Times are normally given in UT however we have already converted these to BST.

Transit time: The GRS crosses the central meridian at: 22:45 BST

Don’t forget to become a FREE member of the site and upload your images, we would love to see them!

Do you have any question or fancy a chat? Join our Facebook Group and don’t forget we give reminders for all the amazing things you can see in the sky on our Facebook Page – give us a like!

If you have a telescope it is possible to view the Great Red Spot (GRS) as it transits across Jupiter. The spot isn’t always visible, it moves around the planet and can only be seen as it crosses the Earth facing side of Jupiter.

The spot can be seen for around two hours before and two hours after it crosses the central point on the planet (the central meridian). This gives a 4 hour window for viewing the spot, the from and to times that the spot is visible can be seen at the top of this page. IMPORTANT NOTE – you will need to check when the plant is visible within the 4 hour window to avoid disappointment. Times are normally given in UT however we have already converted these to BST.

Transit time: The GRS crosses the central meridian at: 02:54 BST

Don’t forget to become a FREE member of the site and upload your images, we would love to see them!

Do you have any question or fancy a chat? Join our Facebook Group and don’t forget we give reminders for all the amazing things you can see in the sky on our Facebook Page – give us a like!

If you have a telescope it is possible to view the Great Red Spot (GRS) as it transits across Jupiter. The spot isn’t always visible, it moves around the planet and can only be seen as it crosses the Earth facing side of Jupiter.

The spot can be seen for around two hours before and two hours after it crosses the central point on the planet (the central meridian). This gives a 4 hour window for viewing the spot, the from and to times that the spot is visible can be seen at the top of this page. IMPORTANT NOTE – you will need to check when the plant is visible within the 4 hour window to avoid disappointment. Times are normally given in UT however we have already converted these to BST.

Transit time: The GRS crosses the central meridian at: 21:07 BST

Don’t forget to become a FREE member of the site and upload your images, we would love to see them!

Do you have any question or fancy a chat? Join our Facebook Group and don’t forget we give reminders for all the amazing things you can see in the sky on our Facebook Page – give us a like!

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